The Glass House...

...and The iconic houses that started it all

They say that you shouldn't throw stones if you live in a glass house...but if you lived here, you should definitely throw parties....

These houses were designed by some of the architectural masterminds of the time. Mies van der Rohe, who is the father of modern architecture and responsible for the house below on the left, Lake Shore Drive in Chicago, the Seagram Building in New York, and the building that I am sitting in right now...One Charles Center in Baltimore. Mies van der Rohe coined the saying "Less is more." and that saying holds true for all of the houses below. His apprentice Phillip Johnson, is best know for his house below on the right, the Glass House, which he actually designed for himself and lived in for 56 years (you wouldn't be able to get me out of that house either). With this design, Johnson not only considered the house itself but also the grounds that surround the house. Johnson thought of the landscape as his wallpaper...(a very expensive wallpaper) but when your walls are made of glass considering your exterior is priceless.

Farnsworth House designed by the famous Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and built in 1949. 

 

A. James Speyer, also an apprentice of Mies van der Rohe, designed this iconic house in 1953. It's most famously know for it's appearance in Ferris Buellers Day Off, as Cameron's house. We all remember his dad's car rolling out the window. Unlike most of these houses which are now controlled by a historical society, this baby was on the market 2 years ago for a whopping $1.65 million dollars.

Glass House designed by Phillip Johnson, apprentice to Mies van der Rohe, and built in 1951.

 
 

Case Study House #22 designed by Pierre Koenig and photographed by the famous Julius Shulman. Then...

Case Study House #22 designed by Pierre Koenig. Now...

This house and particularly the picture on the left is one of my all time favorites. This house was apart of a 20 year case study, challenging the best architects at the time, to create affordable and well designed homes for the housing boom created after World War II . The floor-to-ceiling glass walls gave a panoramic view of Los Angeles and the Hollywood Hills and the use of metal gave the house a modernistic feel. This house was designed by Pierre Koenig and was built in 1959, what sets this house apart from so many of the others at the time (aside from the killer views) is the above photograph taken by Julius Shulman (leading architectural photographer at the time). This house has also appeared in many movies, Corina Corina and Why Do Fools Fall In Love, and most recently it was in the 2004 video game Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas as a safe house. This beauty is definitely on my must-see list once I make it out West!

We would not have all of the the incredible glass houses that we have today if it wasn't for these gems. So if you do live in a glass house...be thankful for the architects above, the design probably wouldn't be here without them. 

Raina out.

 

photo credit: 1 2 3 4 5 6